strength of horizontal vs. vertical 3d printed loop

3D printers, custom projects and parts for enhancing your robot or creating one from scratch.
2 postsPage 1 of 1
2 postsPage 1 of 1

strength of horizontal vs. vertical 3d printed loop

Post by limor » Sun Aug 05, 2012 10:40 am

Post by limor
Sun Aug 05, 2012 10:40 am

We did a small test to see how strong a small plastic printed loop was when printing it on the surface vs. printing it upwards (multiple layers).

Using a fishing wire we pulled against the vertical multi-layer loop. it easily snapped. however the horizontal loop (continuous plastic extrusion) did not snap. it snapped the fishing wire (12kg strength).


Image
direction of build influences rigidity by RoboSavvy, on Flickr
We did a small test to see how strong a small plastic printed loop was when printing it on the surface vs. printing it upwards (multiple layers).

Using a fishing wire we pulled against the vertical multi-layer loop. it easily snapped. however the horizontal loop (continuous plastic extrusion) did not snap. it snapped the fishing wire (12kg strength).


Image
direction of build influences rigidity by RoboSavvy, on Flickr
limor offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
User avatar
Posts: 1845
Joined: Mon Oct 11, 2004 1:00 am
Location: London, UK

Re: strength of horizontal vs. vertical 3d printed loop

Post by tempusmaster » Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:12 am

Post by tempusmaster
Tue Aug 14, 2012 9:12 am

limor wrote:We did a small test to see how strong a small plastic printed loop was when printing it on the surface vs. printing it upwards (multiple layers).

Using a fishing wire we pulled against the vertical multi-layer loop. it easily snapped. however the horizontal loop (continuous plastic extrusion) did not snap. it snapped the fishing wire (12kg strength).


It's a common challenge when designing parts to be 3D printed. If I understand your test correctly, basically what you are doing is delaminating the joint.

Interlayer strength can be improved by carefully calibrating the machine for the particular filament your're using. Filament characteristics, even from the same vendor, vary quite a bit. There's even a significant difference between different colors of the same filament from the same vendor.

To get stronger interlayer adhesion, you want to print at a slightly higher temperature and adjust the design/slicer/gcode so that interfacing layers are printed before the bottom layer has the chance to cool too much.
limor wrote:We did a small test to see how strong a small plastic printed loop was when printing it on the surface vs. printing it upwards (multiple layers).

Using a fishing wire we pulled against the vertical multi-layer loop. it easily snapped. however the horizontal loop (continuous plastic extrusion) did not snap. it snapped the fishing wire (12kg strength).


It's a common challenge when designing parts to be 3D printed. If I understand your test correctly, basically what you are doing is delaminating the joint.

Interlayer strength can be improved by carefully calibrating the machine for the particular filament your're using. Filament characteristics, even from the same vendor, vary quite a bit. There's even a significant difference between different colors of the same filament from the same vendor.

To get stronger interlayer adhesion, you want to print at a slightly higher temperature and adjust the design/slicer/gcode so that interfacing layers are printed before the bottom layer has the chance to cool too much.
Latest robot news, information, reviews, hacks, photos, and videos - with special on-site coverage from Japan
http://www.robots-dreams.com
tempusmaster offline
Site Admin
Site Admin
User avatar
Posts: 532
Joined: Thu Oct 27, 2005 1:00 am


2 postsPage 1 of 1
2 postsPage 1 of 1
cron