microcontrollers

Discussions regarding building a walking robot at home. Most of the robots participating at Robo-One competitions are custom fabricated.
34 postsPage 1 of 31, 2, 3
34 postsPage 1 of 31, 2, 3

microcontrollers

Post by srk » Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:48 am

Post by srk
Thu Jan 04, 2007 4:48 am

hello,
I'm pretty new to robotics and was wondering if anyone has used Microchip PICs for their controller boards. If not, what are the most popular microcontrollers that people use? thanks.
hello,
I'm pretty new to robotics and was wondering if anyone has used Microchip PICs for their controller boards. If not, what are the most popular microcontrollers that people use? thanks.
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Post by limor » Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:02 am

Post by limor
Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:02 am

Hi srk,

The humanoid robot kits come with a controler board and most people stick with it. However those who have replaced their boards or made their own humanoid usually favoured the AVR family (Atmega series) since they provide a free GNU C development environment and other tools.
There have been several controler boards makers that were mentioned on the forum including (from memory) from NewMicros, BDMicro, Olimex, Oricomtech, Sparkfun.

The only thing to ask yourself about the controler board and robot you want to build is if you want any feedback from the servos such as position and current consumption in order to make an interesting control loop. If the answer is yes, then you may need to design your own board (check out openservo) or go with either Bioloid or the recently hacked Robonova.
Hi srk,

The humanoid robot kits come with a controler board and most people stick with it. However those who have replaced their boards or made their own humanoid usually favoured the AVR family (Atmega series) since they provide a free GNU C development environment and other tools.
There have been several controler boards makers that were mentioned on the forum including (from memory) from NewMicros, BDMicro, Olimex, Oricomtech, Sparkfun.

The only thing to ask yourself about the controler board and robot you want to build is if you want any feedback from the servos such as position and current consumption in order to make an interesting control loop. If the answer is yes, then you may need to design your own board (check out openservo) or go with either Bioloid or the recently hacked Robonova.
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Post by slashsplat » Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:39 am

Post by slashsplat
Sun Jan 14, 2007 3:39 am

If you are new to all this, and just want to get started, I had REALLY good luck with the Parallax Basic Stamp in the BoE-BOT little robot. They are about $80 on eBay and well worth it. They have EVERY sensor you can imagine and EXAMPLE SOURCE CODE for everything. Excellent way to get started. They have a TRACK kit for it that I just got and it is COOL. I use it with a MEMSIC as an inclinometer to sense when it should not climb and just turn away. Neat for less than $150 total.

The Basic Stamp is NOT designed for a robot with lots of servos and lacks most of the sophistication that my MANOI has, but it is 1/15 the price.
If you are new to all this, and just want to get started, I had REALLY good luck with the Parallax Basic Stamp in the BoE-BOT little robot. They are about $80 on eBay and well worth it. They have EVERY sensor you can imagine and EXAMPLE SOURCE CODE for everything. Excellent way to get started. They have a TRACK kit for it that I just got and it is COOL. I use it with a MEMSIC as an inclinometer to sense when it should not climb and just turn away. Neat for less than $150 total.

The Basic Stamp is NOT designed for a robot with lots of servos and lacks most of the sophistication that my MANOI has, but it is 1/15 the price.
<i>Ira Chandler</i> /* slashsplat */
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Post by jonkster » Sun Jan 14, 2007 10:28 am

Post by jonkster
Sun Jan 14, 2007 10:28 am

Early on I tried using a PIC16F86. Got it to work in a very simple setup but was hard going without USART. Couldn't get more than 57600 to dynamixels and couldn't do much processing or it would not communicate well - most of the time it was bit banging the communication to the dynamixel. Mileage may vary but if your going with PIC get something with some horsepower rather than low end ones (and with USART).

I ended up going with a board using a AVR Mega128. 2 USARTS make it easy (can also run a terminal interface much same as CM5) and I prefer the architecture and development environment.

Jon K
Early on I tried using a PIC16F86. Got it to work in a very simple setup but was hard going without USART. Couldn't get more than 57600 to dynamixels and couldn't do much processing or it would not communicate well - most of the time it was bit banging the communication to the dynamixel. Mileage may vary but if your going with PIC get something with some horsepower rather than low end ones (and with USART).

I ended up going with a board using a AVR Mega128. 2 USARTS make it easy (can also run a terminal interface much same as CM5) and I prefer the architecture and development environment.

Jon K
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Post by Robo1 » Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:45 pm

Post by Robo1
Sun Jan 14, 2007 12:45 pm

I would agree with slashsplat

I learn about basic electronics in the summer with parallels stamp beginners kit. It basically comes with all the types of componets that your will use pots,servos,sensors,LED,buttons...... and has a big manual. It took me about 2 weeks to go through it and in the end I felt very confident about basic electronics and gave me the knowledge and confident to buy my first big robot (KHR-2).

I did come from a high level programming back ground so it was mainly learning about the circuits but I would highly recommend this kit.

bren
I would agree with slashsplat

I learn about basic electronics in the summer with parallels stamp beginners kit. It basically comes with all the types of componets that your will use pots,servos,sensors,LED,buttons...... and has a big manual. It took me about 2 weeks to go through it and in the end I felt very confident about basic electronics and gave me the knowledge and confident to buy my first big robot (KHR-2).

I did come from a high level programming back ground so it was mainly learning about the circuits but I would highly recommend this kit.

bren
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multi-core Micro

Post by edmen » Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:28 pm

Post by edmen
Sun Jan 28, 2007 11:28 pm

hello, has anyone tried using the new chip by parralax propelled chip ?
hello, has anyone tried using the new chip by parralax propelled chip ?
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Re: multi-core Micro

Post by slashsplat » Mon Jan 29, 2007 3:05 am

Post by slashsplat
Mon Jan 29, 2007 3:05 am

edmen wrote:hello, has anyone tried using the new chip by parralax propeller chip ?
In speaking with Jim Carey at Parrallax, I know that they are VERY interested in folks like us using the chip. It is a great design that they spent many years perfecting. The support from Parallax has been outstanding for the years I have worked with their Basic Stamps, and if that is an indication, the Propeller would be worth looking into seriously. The way they have eight chips that can all run tasks independently is totally cool, and VERY well supported in the OO language they use to drive it.

I have no hands-on experience, but ONLY due to lack of time. They are working on some cool tutorials and have tech support standing by to assist integration efforts. They also have sensors galore and experience integrating them...
edmen wrote:hello, has anyone tried using the new chip by parralax propeller chip ?
In speaking with Jim Carey at Parrallax, I know that they are VERY interested in folks like us using the chip. It is a great design that they spent many years perfecting. The support from Parallax has been outstanding for the years I have worked with their Basic Stamps, and if that is an indication, the Propeller would be worth looking into seriously. The way they have eight chips that can all run tasks independently is totally cool, and VERY well supported in the OO language they use to drive it.

I have no hands-on experience, but ONLY due to lack of time. They are working on some cool tutorials and have tech support standing by to assist integration efforts. They also have sensors galore and experience integrating them...
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Post by RobotJay » Tue Jan 30, 2007 3:19 pm

Post by RobotJay
Tue Jan 30, 2007 3:19 pm

It is entirely possible (and quite easy) to use a BASIC Stamp from parallax to control a biped. Check out my thread about the homebrew bot I built around the BS2. If you want a place to start, there is no product on the market as easy to learn or as well supported as the BASIC Stamps from Parallax.

BTW: BASIC is the programming language used to program the stamp, not its level of functionality. The stamp itself is very far from "basic."
It is entirely possible (and quite easy) to use a BASIC Stamp from parallax to control a biped. Check out my thread about the homebrew bot I built around the BS2. If you want a place to start, there is no product on the market as easy to learn or as well supported as the BASIC Stamps from Parallax.

BTW: BASIC is the programming language used to program the stamp, not its level of functionality. The stamp itself is very far from "basic."
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Post by tinman1 » Wed Jan 31, 2007 1:24 am

Post by tinman1
Wed Jan 31, 2007 1:24 am

I started with the Parallax kit and book called "Whats a microcontroller" with the basic stamp. It was my introduction to electronics and programming. I can say from my own experience it is a great book and kit. It taught me alot.
I've found it would be a bonus for anyone interested in getting started. :wink:
Tinman
I started with the Parallax kit and book called "Whats a microcontroller" with the basic stamp. It was my introduction to electronics and programming. I can say from my own experience it is a great book and kit. It taught me alot.
I've found it would be a bonus for anyone interested in getting started. :wink:
Tinman
Tell me again. What happens when these 2 wires touch?
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Post by Logicalsifter » Wed Apr 04, 2007 2:51 pm

Post by Logicalsifter
Wed Apr 04, 2007 2:51 pm

I was looking into buying the boe bot robot from parallax.com, I'm new to robot building and i want to utilize soildworks 2007 pro for design but i wanted to get more info on what i need to get started in to robot building/custom designing!
I was looking into buying the boe bot robot from parallax.com, I'm new to robot building and i want to utilize soildworks 2007 pro for design but i wanted to get more info on what i need to get started in to robot building/custom designing!
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Post by RobotJay » Wed Apr 04, 2007 3:26 pm

Post by RobotJay
Wed Apr 04, 2007 3:26 pm

["Logicalsifter"]I was looking into buying the boe bot robot from parallax.com, I'm new to robot building and i want to utilize soildworks 2007 pro for design but i wanted to get more info on what i need to get started in to robot building/custom designing![/quote]
["Logicalsifter"]I was looking into buying the boe bot robot from parallax.com, I'm new to robot building and i want to utilize soildworks 2007 pro for design but i wanted to get more info on what i need to get started in to robot building/custom designing![/quote]
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Post by RobotJay » Wed Apr 04, 2007 3:31 pm

Post by RobotJay
Wed Apr 04, 2007 3:31 pm

Logicalsifter wrote:I was looking into buying the boe bot robot from parallax.com, I'm new to robot building and i want to utilize soildworks 2007 pro for design but i wanted to get more info on what i need to get started in to robot building/custom designing!


I think that the tutorials that come with the BoE-Bot and Solidworks is about as good an education you can get in microcontrolled robotics. Just go through the experiments that come with the BoE-Bot, and do the tutorials in SolidWorks. Both tools are very user friendly and easy to learn.

-Jay
Logicalsifter wrote:I was looking into buying the boe bot robot from parallax.com, I'm new to robot building and i want to utilize soildworks 2007 pro for design but i wanted to get more info on what i need to get started in to robot building/custom designing!


I think that the tutorials that come with the BoE-Bot and Solidworks is about as good an education you can get in microcontrolled robotics. Just go through the experiments that come with the BoE-Bot, and do the tutorials in SolidWorks. Both tools are very user friendly and easy to learn.

-Jay
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Post by Robo1 » Wed Apr 04, 2007 5:21 pm

Post by Robo1
Wed Apr 04, 2007 5:21 pm

hello

I love the parallax range for the good education stuff.

I bought the board of education last summer and it took about 2 weeks to work through and by the end I felt confident to try my own projects. I did come from a programming background so only had to learn the eletronic side.

I also use solidworks. only 2005 but It took about a day to learn but again I came from a background of 3d modelling so it was a case of working out what button did what rather then getting my head around 3d software.

hope this helps bren
hello

I love the parallax range for the good education stuff.

I bought the board of education last summer and it took about 2 weeks to work through and by the end I felt confident to try my own projects. I did come from a programming background so only had to learn the eletronic side.

I also use solidworks. only 2005 but It took about a day to learn but again I came from a background of 3d modelling so it was a case of working out what button did what rather then getting my head around 3d software.

hope this helps bren
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Post by Logicalsifter » Thu Apr 05, 2007 4:17 am

Post by Logicalsifter
Thu Apr 05, 2007 4:17 am

Yah thanks guy i know a lil bit about 3D modeling useing 3D max 7 and i take a college beginner class in programming and pass with flying colors, So i know a bit "notting to much" but like you guys said I'll be confident and have an better understanding when i get the Boe-Bot from parallax thinking of that i'll just order one this weekend when i get paid and play around with the bot so i get a better under standing on how to build them! Now but useing soildworks on the other hand i haveing lil problems with measure values,Angles,Radius things and putting that in to soildworks, My dad give me his set of measuring tools like an Dial caliper and a micrometer from (alltrade) so dont know if i need any other tools to get measurements. But getting to the point on what i'm trying to say is i want to start practicing on measuring things like my R/C Servo get the measurements useing the tools. i got an SolidWorks Part Document of a AX-12 Servo and it helped me a but on standing on how to create someting like that on soildworks but didnt hearn how to do that from scratch and haveing a hard time with that and i dont know if i'm doing anything worng or if there an technique on how to put all those measurements to work on soildworks!
Yah thanks guy i know a lil bit about 3D modeling useing 3D max 7 and i take a college beginner class in programming and pass with flying colors, So i know a bit "notting to much" but like you guys said I'll be confident and have an better understanding when i get the Boe-Bot from parallax thinking of that i'll just order one this weekend when i get paid and play around with the bot so i get a better under standing on how to build them! Now but useing soildworks on the other hand i haveing lil problems with measure values,Angles,Radius things and putting that in to soildworks, My dad give me his set of measuring tools like an Dial caliper and a micrometer from (alltrade) so dont know if i need any other tools to get measurements. But getting to the point on what i'm trying to say is i want to start practicing on measuring things like my R/C Servo get the measurements useing the tools. i got an SolidWorks Part Document of a AX-12 Servo and it helped me a but on standing on how to create someting like that on soildworks but didnt hearn how to do that from scratch and haveing a hard time with that and i dont know if i'm doing anything worng or if there an technique on how to put all those measurements to work on soildworks!
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Post by Robo1 » Thu Apr 05, 2007 6:20 pm

Post by Robo1
Thu Apr 05, 2007 6:20 pm

Solidworks is different from max as you don't pull and push points. But instead you do two processes:

Sketch
Extrude/Cut

First you Sketch a plan (this is where you put the diminsions). Then you use that sketch to extrude/Cut.

All the objects are designed in PARTS then you put them together in an ASSEMBALY.

After a couple of hours you can will be able to pick it up.

Bren
Solidworks is different from max as you don't pull and push points. But instead you do two processes:

Sketch
Extrude/Cut

First you Sketch a plan (this is where you put the diminsions). Then you use that sketch to extrude/Cut.

All the objects are designed in PARTS then you put them together in an ASSEMBALY.

After a couple of hours you can will be able to pick it up.

Bren
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