Bioloid Premium?

Bioloid robot kit from Korean company Robotis; CM5 controller block, AX12 servos..
8 postsPage 1 of 1
8 postsPage 1 of 1

Bioloid Premium?

Post by urbansheepdog » Mon May 20, 2013 2:36 pm

Post by urbansheepdog
Mon May 20, 2013 2:36 pm

Well, here I am, 3 years later and still on the brink of buying my first robot.

Originally I was thinking about getting the Robonova but I see it has come and gone now. I keep coming back to the Bioloid Premium as it looks like a good first robot.

I haven't done any programing before but come from a good engineering design background so mechanical stuff is OK.

As a first robot, do you think that the Bioloid would be a good choice or maybe the KHR 3HV? I've also been looking at the Manoi AT01 but from what I've read on here there seems to be problems with translations etc.

I don't want to give myself migranes trying to work out problems. The Bioloid seems to have the most ready available spares and add-ons on Robosavvy.

I've been doing a bit of reading up and experimenting with the free software download of RobotBasic and have bought the Robots in the Classroom: Learn to Program with RobotBASIC book. Is this going to help me with a programming in general or just muddy the waters?

Your opinions and help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
Well, here I am, 3 years later and still on the brink of buying my first robot.

Originally I was thinking about getting the Robonova but I see it has come and gone now. I keep coming back to the Bioloid Premium as it looks like a good first robot.

I haven't done any programing before but come from a good engineering design background so mechanical stuff is OK.

As a first robot, do you think that the Bioloid would be a good choice or maybe the KHR 3HV? I've also been looking at the Manoi AT01 but from what I've read on here there seems to be problems with translations etc.

I don't want to give myself migranes trying to work out problems. The Bioloid seems to have the most ready available spares and add-ons on Robosavvy.

I've been doing a bit of reading up and experimenting with the free software download of RobotBasic and have bought the Robots in the Classroom: Learn to Program with RobotBASIC book. Is this going to help me with a programming in general or just muddy the waters?

Your opinions and help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
urbansheepdog offline
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 9:51 am

Post by siempre.aprendiendo » Tue May 21, 2013 8:54 am

Post by siempre.aprendiendo
Tue May 21, 2013 8:54 am

What do you want to do? Play only with the humanoid, build the walkers that your imagination will dream, you want to learn programming?

Bioloid is a wonderful kit to build lots of robots.

Anyway, if you want to create interestings behavoirs, you will need to learn one of C#, C, C++, or may be Python.Not if you only want to telecontrol ol it or create motions with minimal interactions with the environment.

You could see programming examples with Bioloid (and others platforms) at www.softwaresouls.com/softwaresouls
What do you want to do? Play only with the humanoid, build the walkers that your imagination will dream, you want to learn programming?

Bioloid is a wonderful kit to build lots of robots.

Anyway, if you want to create interestings behavoirs, you will need to learn one of C#, C, C++, or may be Python.Not if you only want to telecontrol ol it or create motions with minimal interactions with the environment.

You could see programming examples with Bioloid (and others platforms) at www.softwaresouls.com/softwaresouls
siempre.aprendiendo offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
User avatar
Posts: 559
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:13 pm
Location: Barcelona

Post by PaulL » Tue May 21, 2013 12:05 pm

Post by PaulL
Tue May 21, 2013 12:05 pm

Off the shelf, the Bioloid Premium kit is probably the best bang for the buck these days - most available, best supported, etc. I'm still a Robonova fan, though. Not of the controller, more of the look and the geometry.
Off the shelf, the Bioloid Premium kit is probably the best bang for the buck these days - most available, best supported, etc. I'm still a Robonova fan, though. Not of the controller, more of the look and the geometry.
PaulL offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
Posts: 423
Joined: Sat Sep 15, 2007 12:52 am

Post by urbansheepdog » Tue May 21, 2013 4:00 pm

Post by urbansheepdog
Tue May 21, 2013 4:00 pm

I must admit that it was the looks of the Robanova that attracted me, plus I downloaded the animated software that allowed you to create sequences of movements.

Whatever I get, it probably be a steepish learning curve for me. I think the 'Catch and play' (?) software with the Bioloid will keep me amused for long enough.

I want a robot just for amusement really, I guess. But I would also like to learn programming. About a year ago I bought a book on C & C++ for absolute beginners but unless you have some sort of outlet it's just a bunch of words, or so it feels.

I think I've kind of settled on Bioloid and it would probably be a humanoid that would most interest me. I'm wondering if I should push the boat out and go for the GP Bioloid, or do you think that it might be too big a step for a first-timer??

I think ultimately I'm looking towards a robot that can run set programmed moves and maybe later on a robot that interacts with it's environment.

What I don't want to do is spend £1,000 and then two months later wish I'd added another £800 and got something that would have suited me better.

Because I have no previous experience to draw on it's a bit of a shot in the dark! :? I've had a lifetime experience of Radio Control models, so servos and wiring and engineering is fine, it's just the whole programming thing will have to be learned and understood.

If money were no object, I'd probably go for something like Nao! Something that has great movement and interaction.

Thank you for the link to Software Souls. I'll have a good look through the site.
I must admit that it was the looks of the Robanova that attracted me, plus I downloaded the animated software that allowed you to create sequences of movements.

Whatever I get, it probably be a steepish learning curve for me. I think the 'Catch and play' (?) software with the Bioloid will keep me amused for long enough.

I want a robot just for amusement really, I guess. But I would also like to learn programming. About a year ago I bought a book on C & C++ for absolute beginners but unless you have some sort of outlet it's just a bunch of words, or so it feels.

I think I've kind of settled on Bioloid and it would probably be a humanoid that would most interest me. I'm wondering if I should push the boat out and go for the GP Bioloid, or do you think that it might be too big a step for a first-timer??

I think ultimately I'm looking towards a robot that can run set programmed moves and maybe later on a robot that interacts with it's environment.

What I don't want to do is spend £1,000 and then two months later wish I'd added another £800 and got something that would have suited me better.

Because I have no previous experience to draw on it's a bit of a shot in the dark! :? I've had a lifetime experience of Radio Control models, so servos and wiring and engineering is fine, it's just the whole programming thing will have to be learned and understood.

If money were no object, I'd probably go for something like Nao! Something that has great movement and interaction.

Thank you for the link to Software Souls. I'll have a good look through the site.
urbansheepdog offline
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 9:51 am

Post by siempre.aprendiendo » Tue May 21, 2013 4:26 pm

Post by siempre.aprendiendo
Tue May 21, 2013 4:26 pm

Bioloid GP does not offer more "playability", but metal parts and some AX-18, faster than AX-12. It's oriented to telecontrolled combats.

NAO software is, IMHO, the best behavoir creation software, but not only the tool matters, the creation of sofware requires several abilities as very detailed thinking, capacity of logical structuration and strong abstraction capacity.
Bioloid GP does not offer more "playability", but metal parts and some AX-18, faster than AX-12. It's oriented to telecontrolled combats.

NAO software is, IMHO, the best behavoir creation software, but not only the tool matters, the creation of sofware requires several abilities as very detailed thinking, capacity of logical structuration and strong abstraction capacity.
siempre.aprendiendo offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
User avatar
Posts: 559
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:13 pm
Location: Barcelona

Post by urbansheepdog » Tue May 21, 2013 5:23 pm

Post by urbansheepdog
Tue May 21, 2013 5:23 pm

Thank you very much. Your help and input is greatly appreciated.

It's looking more and more like the Bioloid Premium is the way to go for me.

It looks to have a really good array of spares and add-ons here on RoboSavvy.

Plus the forum will be great for support and getting help if and when I get stuck :D

Do you think I should forget about the RobotBasic program I have (this is different from the RoboBasic program in with Bioloid) and start reading up on C in my beginners book?
Thank you very much. Your help and input is greatly appreciated.

It's looking more and more like the Bioloid Premium is the way to go for me.

It looks to have a really good array of spares and add-ons here on RoboSavvy.

Plus the forum will be great for support and getting help if and when I get stuck :D

Do you think I should forget about the RobotBasic program I have (this is different from the RoboBasic program in with Bioloid) and start reading up on C in my beginners book?
urbansheepdog offline
Newbie
Newbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Fri May 21, 2010 9:51 am

Post by siempre.aprendiendo » Tue May 21, 2013 7:12 pm

Post by siempre.aprendiendo
Tue May 21, 2013 7:12 pm

I don't know RoboBasic, (http://www.robotbasic.org ?) but if it could manage serial port communications it could be useful to you if you can use it in a Raspberry Pi o similar. But I always prefer standard programming language, because is far more easily used in any operating system, and usually are more powerful.

C# is a very nice language, and .Net libraries are also pretty nice (although I don't like Microsoft very much), and like Python I think are easier to learn than C or C++. C++ is, IMHO, far more complex, but, also, far more powerful (It is my preferred language). May be the most complex feature of C, compared to C# and Python, is the use of pointers and some standard libraries.

As there are free resources to learn and free compilers you can test them and select the one you feel more comfortable with.

Hope it helps :)
I don't know RoboBasic, (http://www.robotbasic.org ?) but if it could manage serial port communications it could be useful to you if you can use it in a Raspberry Pi o similar. But I always prefer standard programming language, because is far more easily used in any operating system, and usually are more powerful.

C# is a very nice language, and .Net libraries are also pretty nice (although I don't like Microsoft very much), and like Python I think are easier to learn than C or C++. C++ is, IMHO, far more complex, but, also, far more powerful (It is my preferred language). May be the most complex feature of C, compared to C# and Python, is the use of pointers and some standard libraries.

As there are free resources to learn and free compilers you can test them and select the one you feel more comfortable with.

Hope it helps :)
siempre.aprendiendo offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
User avatar
Posts: 559
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:13 pm
Location: Barcelona

Interesting C. C++ compilers/IDEs

Post by siempre.aprendiendo » Thu May 23, 2013 8:41 am

Post by siempre.aprendiendo
Thu May 23, 2013 8:41 am

By the way. IMHO, currently the most interesting compilers are:

Linux & Microsoft: (free as speech)
Eclipse CDT
QT creator (very nice cross-platform application framework, specially for its graphical user interface (GUI))

Microsoft: (free as beer)
Visual C++ Express (an approach for Linux is monodevelop, but I don't would bet in it too much)
By the way. IMHO, currently the most interesting compilers are:

Linux & Microsoft: (free as speech)
Eclipse CDT
QT creator (very nice cross-platform application framework, specially for its graphical user interface (GUI))

Microsoft: (free as beer)
Visual C++ Express (an approach for Linux is monodevelop, but I don't would bet in it too much)
siempre.aprendiendo offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
User avatar
Posts: 559
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2007 9:13 pm
Location: Barcelona


8 postsPage 1 of 1
8 postsPage 1 of 1