Aldebaran launching 1.4m high humanoid at EUR 250k

News and announcements related to Humanoids/walkers, robo-one/other conferences, intelligent servos, advanced robot controllers/sensors, and interesting new humanoid related developments.
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Aldebaran launching 1.4m high humanoid at EUR 250k

Post by limor » Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:57 am

Post by limor
Tue Dec 21, 2010 9:57 am

intended for elderly and disabled wealthy individuals who will prefer to spend their time and money in the company of a robot with soft torso

http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robo ... obot-romeo

Image
intended for elderly and disabled wealthy individuals who will prefer to spend their time and money in the company of a robot with soft torso

http://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robo ... obot-romeo

Image
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Post by billyzelsnack » Tue Dec 21, 2010 4:18 pm

Post by billyzelsnack
Tue Dec 21, 2010 4:18 pm

But most humanoid robots use motor and gears to power their joints, and these mechanisms are not backdrivable—due to energy losses in the gears and you can’t relate the electrical current in the motors to force. That’s why they need force sensors if you want to move in a compliant way; it’s called active compliance. Romeo is different. It has no gears. We transmit the motion from the motors to the joints using screws and cables. This system is backdrivable.


Since when is a screw not a gear? I guess they are using a ballscrew, but are ballscrews really all that backdrivable compared to a spur based gearbox?

http://www.roton.com/application_engineering.aspx#11

Seems like a regular spur gear setup can achieve similar backdriveability efficiency.
But most humanoid robots use motor and gears to power their joints, and these mechanisms are not backdrivable—due to energy losses in the gears and you can’t relate the electrical current in the motors to force. That’s why they need force sensors if you want to move in a compliant way; it’s called active compliance. Romeo is different. It has no gears. We transmit the motion from the motors to the joints using screws and cables. This system is backdrivable.


Since when is a screw not a gear? I guess they are using a ballscrew, but are ballscrews really all that backdrivable compared to a spur based gearbox?

http://www.roton.com/application_engineering.aspx#11

Seems like a regular spur gear setup can achieve similar backdriveability efficiency.
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