humanoid robot football issues?

Anything that doesn't fit our other forums goes here.
3 postsPage 1 of 1
3 postsPage 1 of 1

humanoid robot football issues?

Post by Traull » Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:05 am

Post by Traull
Sun Nov 21, 2010 2:05 am

i have noticed there are 2 sets of rules with regards to robot football, mainly involving the use of remote control and sensor control. do you know which one is more commonly used in uk events.
the sensor matches are intense but slow where as the remote control makes it more entertaining but less accurate.

has any one competed in these events as i do not want to start adding loads of sensors to a robot that could not really need it.
i have noticed there are 2 sets of rules with regards to robot football, mainly involving the use of remote control and sensor control. do you know which one is more commonly used in uk events.
the sensor matches are intense but slow where as the remote control makes it more entertaining but less accurate.

has any one competed in these events as i do not want to start adding loads of sensors to a robot that could not really need it.
Traull offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 3:30 am

Post by i-Bot » Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:10 am

Post by i-Bot
Sun Nov 21, 2010 11:10 am

We had a few events in the UK which were great fun, but more kick abouts than proper matches. Orac made us a pitch board which gave us a consistent flat and standard surface. Typically we had two or three humanoids per side.

Humanoids were remote controlled. IR was found to be a problem due to directionality, so most competitors used either wireless PS2 controllers or bluetooth. Remote control is more interactive and less technically demanding. No special sensors were used although some bots had gyros for stability or accelerometers to recover from falls.

Most developed a set of moves specific to the socker which were different from the standard moves. You need a few moves to get around the pitch quick, a couple of kick moves of course, and lots of small shuffles/dribbles (left/right, back forth, rotate). Plus stand up moves from any fallen pose, often front and back using shuffles to get to front or back position.
We had a few events in the UK which were great fun, but more kick abouts than proper matches. Orac made us a pitch board which gave us a consistent flat and standard surface. Typically we had two or three humanoids per side.

Humanoids were remote controlled. IR was found to be a problem due to directionality, so most competitors used either wireless PS2 controllers or bluetooth. Remote control is more interactive and less technically demanding. No special sensors were used although some bots had gyros for stability or accelerometers to recover from falls.

Most developed a set of moves specific to the socker which were different from the standard moves. You need a few moves to get around the pitch quick, a couple of kick moves of course, and lots of small shuffles/dribbles (left/right, back forth, rotate). Plus stand up moves from any fallen pose, often front and back using shuffles to get to front or back position.
i-Bot offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
User avatar
Posts: 1142
Joined: Wed May 17, 2006 1:00 am

Post by Traull » Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:39 am

Post by Traull
Mon Nov 22, 2010 11:39 am

thats very helpful thanks

i have been looking to get the bluetooth adapter for the ps2 controller but i have not been able to find places that sell it, is it the same type that you have been using?????
or are there other types?????

http://robosavvy.com/Builders/l3v3rz/Jo ... 281%29.pdf
thats very helpful thanks

i have been looking to get the bluetooth adapter for the ps2 controller but i have not been able to find places that sell it, is it the same type that you have been using?????
or are there other types?????

http://robosavvy.com/Builders/l3v3rz/Jo ... 281%29.pdf
Traull offline
Savvy Roboteer
Savvy Roboteer
Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Nov 09, 2010 3:30 am


3 postsPage 1 of 1
3 postsPage 1 of 1